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Rhythm: how to know if your child is developing properly?

Developmental milestones are an important reference, but not the only ones, to discuss with the pediatrician.

Each child has their own rhythm when it comes to developing certain abilities such as rolling over, sitting, crawling, walking, talking… Us at BabyHome, base our information on developmental milestones, which work as a sort of reference to follow the child’s evolution. In other words, these are universal figures that estimate that the child should lay on their stomach around the fifth month and sit up on their own during the sixth month, for example.

It stipulates a median age at which certain abilities should be acquired, but, as we’ve mentioned before, no baby is made the same. In order to know if your child is developing properly, the ideal periods can’t stray too far from the average – which is what happens when the child is almost nine months old and still cannot sit up on their own.

Premature babies tend to take more time than others to hit these milestones. Don’t demand certain things from the child nor should you try to anticipate or skip certain stages as a way to stimulate them, as each phase has its importance. Progress should always be evaluated by a pediatrician, individually, observing and respecting each baby’s characteristics.